3D Bioprinted Placenta Model Could Lead to Treatment for Maternal Fatalities

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    Part of the problem with learning more about preeclampsia is the fact that the placenta is an organ that doesn’t really exist until a woman becomes pregnant, making it difficult to impossible to accurately study without putting the mother and fetus in jeopardy.

    The human placenta is different from that in nearly all other mammals, so research and testing on an animal placenta wouldn’t lead to much useful data.

    We may be on the road to understanding more about how the placenta works, and what happens when it doesn’t work, thanks to 3D bioprinting.

    A team of researchers brought together from the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation at Children’s National Health System and the Tissue Engineering & Biomaterials Laboratory, Fischell Department of Bioengineering at the University of Maryland created the first 3D bioprinted placenta model and successfully used it in a preeclampsia study.

    Modern bioprinting has advanced to the level that the research team was able to successfully produce a placenta model that would accurately mimic the organ’s highly complex cellular structure.

    The placenta model provided the researchers with an opportunity to produce groundbreaking research that could lead to new, life-saving treatments for a wide range of pregnancy-related medical complications.

    There are some medical theories that suggest that one of the causes of preeclampsia lies with a type of special cell in the placenta called trophoblasts.

    In a healthy placenta, the trophoblasts attach themselves to the uterine wall and then start to grow into the tissues of the uterus during the first stage of pregnancy, essentially bonding both organs together.

    In a new study that was published in American Chemical Society Biomaterials Science & Engineering, the scientists detail their research which involved using the bioprinted model to observe the migration of trophoblasts cells form the placenta to the uterus.

    The bioprinted placenta model created by the research team contained key cellular, biochemical, and extracellular matrix components that accurately simulated the process of trophoblast migration.

    This is the first time scientists were able to successfully 3D bioprint a placenta and test cell migration of this type, and it could lead to several life-saving medical treatments.

    The team was able to successfully use the 3D bioprinted placenta model to track the results of introducing epidermal growth factor, a peptide that stimulates cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation, on trophoblast migration.

    The reason that the 3D bioprinted model was able to provide such valuable data is the fact that the scientists were able to learn far more about the dynamic behavior of the trophoblast cell movements than more traditional 2D models.

    According to their research paper, the 3D bio printed placenta model is a promising first step to developing a more sophisticated placenta model that could be bioengineered as a powerful testing and research tool.

    Being able to accurately simulate the biological workings of an organ like a placenta could help them develop new treatments for preeclampsia and other similar placenta-related conditions including placenta accreta and placenta previa.

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